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129

Name: 129
Abbreviation: 129
Super-category: Inbred mouse strain
URL: Beck, J.A., et al., Genealogies of mouse inbred strains (2000), Nature, Jan2000, v24, p23
Id: birnlex_219
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  • Externally Sourced Definition: Inbr and colour depends on substrain (see below). Origin: Dunn 1928 from crosses of coat colour stocks from English fanciers and a chinchilla stock from Castle. This strain has a common origin with strain 101. Most substrains carry the white-bellied agouti gene AW though only a subset have the agouti pattern as many carry albino or chinchilla and/or the pink-eyed dilution gene, p, which is derived from Asian mice of the Mus musculus type (see also strains SJL, P/J and FS/Ei) (Brilliant et al, 1994). It is known for the high incidence of spontaneous testicular teratomas, though the incidence differs between substrains, but more recently it has been the most widely used strain in the production of targeted mutations due to the availability of several lines of embryonic stem cells. Two recent studies show that there is major genetic variation within the 129 "family", at least some of which must be attributed to genetic contamination (Threadgill et al, 1997,Simpson et al, 1997). Strain 129/SvJ was genetically contaminated in about 1978 by an unknown strain, and differs from other 129 substrains at about 25% of SSLP genetic markers. Threadgill et al suggest that it is equivalent to a recombinant congenic strain and suggest that it is designated 129cX/Sv. Simpson et al recognised three major groups of substrains: parental substrains, steel substrains and "ter" substrains. Threadgill et al identified substrains 129/Ola, 129/J, 129/Sv, 129/ReJ and 129/RrRk, and the associated embryonic stem cells. Clearly, major revision of the nomenclature of this group of strains is necessary. This will be undertaken in the next revision. In the mean time, people doing targeted mutagenesis should take special care to ensure that the genotype of their embryonic stem cell culture matches the substrain of mice which they use.
  • Abbreviation Source: MGI

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Pages in category "129"

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Facts about 129RDF feed
Abbrev129  +
AbbrevSourceMGI  +
Created15 August 2007  +
CurationStatuspending_final_vetting  +
DefiningCitationBeck, J.A., et al., Genealogies of mouse inbred strains (2000), Nature, Jan2000, v24, p23  +
ExternallySourcedDefinitionInbr and colour depends on substrain (see Inbr and colour depends on substrain (see below). Origin: Dunn 1928 from crosses of coat colour stocks from English fanciers and a chinchilla stock from Castle. This strain has a common origin with strain 101. Most substrains carry the white-bellied agouti gene AW though only a subset have the agouti pattern as many carry albino or chinchilla and/or the pink-eyed dilution gene, p, which is derived from Asian mice of the Mus musculus type (see also strains SJL, P/J and FS/Ei) (Brilliant et al, 1994). It is known for the high incidence of spontaneous testicular teratomas, though the incidence differs between substrains, but more recently it has been the most widely used strain in the production of targeted mutations due to the availability of several lines of embryonic stem cells. Two recent studies show that there is major genetic variation within the 129 "family", at least some of which must be attributed to genetic contamination (Threadgill et al, 1997,Simpson et al, 1997). Strain 129/SvJ was genetically contaminated in about 1978 by an unknown strain, and differs from other 129 substrains at about 25% of SSLP genetic markers. Threadgill et al suggest that it is equivalent to a recombinant congenic strain and suggest that it is designated 129cX/Sv. Simpson et al recognised three major groups of substrains: parental substrains, steel substrains and "ter" substrains. Threadgill et al identified substrains 129/Ola, 129/J, 129/Sv, 129/ReJ and 129/RrRk, and the associated embryonic stem cells. Clearly, major revision of the nomenclature of this group of strains is necessary. This will be undertaken in the next revision. In the mean time, people doing targeted mutagenesis should take special care to ensure that the genotype of their embryonic stem cell culture matches the substrain of mice which they use. ches the substrain of mice which they use.
Idbirnlex_219  +
Label129  +
ModifiedDate30 May 2009  +
SuperCategoryInbred mouse strain  +