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Accessory nerve

Name: Accessory nerve
Description: The 11th cranial nerve. The accessory nerve originates from neurons in the medulla and in the cervical spinal cord. It has a cranial root, which joins the vagus (10th cranial) nerve and sends motor fibers to the muscles of the larynx, and a spinal root, which sends motor fibers to the trapezius and the sternocleidomastoid muscles. Damage to the nerve produces weakness in head rotation and shoulder elevation. Definition Source: MeSH
Synonym(s): Eleventh cranial nerve, Cranial nerve XI, spinal accessory nerve
Super-category: Cranial nerve
Id: birnlex_812
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Parts of Accessory nerve


  • Externally Sourced Definition: The 11th cranial nerve. The accessory nerve originates from neurons in the medulla and in the cervical spinal cord. It has a cranial root, which joins the vagus (10th cranial) nerve and sends motor fibers to the muscles of the larynx, and a spinal root, which sends motor fibers to the trapezius and the sternocleidomastoid muscles. Damage to the nerve produces weakness in head rotation and shoulder elevation.
  • Definition Source: MeSH

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Facts about Accessory nerveRDF feed
Created20 August 2007  +
CurationStatusuncurated  +
DefinitionThe 11th cranial nerve. The accessory nerv The 11th cranial nerve. The accessory nerve originates from neurons in the medulla and in the cervical spinal cord. It has a cranial root, which joins the vagus (10th cranial) nerve and sends motor fibers to the muscles of the larynx, and a spinal root, which sends motor fibers to the trapezius and the sternocleidomastoid muscles. Damage to the nerve produces weakness in head rotation and shoulder elevation. Definition Source: MeSH houlder elevation. Definition Source: MeSH
DefinitionSourceMeSH  +
ExternallySourcedDefinitionThe 11th cranial nerve. The accessory nerv The 11th cranial nerve. The accessory nerve originates from neurons in the medulla and in the cervical spinal cord. It has a cranial root, which joins the vagus (10th cranial) nerve and sends motor fibers to the muscles of the larynx, and a spinal root, which sends motor fibers to the trapezius and the sternocleidomastoid muscles. Damage to the nerve produces weakness in head rotation and shoulder elevation. s in head rotation and shoulder elevation.
Idbirnlex_812  +
LabelAccessory nerve  +
ModifiedDate14 October 2010  +
SuperCategoryCranial nerve  +
SynonymEleventh cranial nerve  +, Cranial nerve XI  +, and spinal accessory nerve  +
UmlscuiC0000905, C1305777  +