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Resource:Center for Imaging of Neurodegenerative Diseases

Name: Resource:Center for Imaging of Neurodegenerative Diseases
Description: Biomedical technology research center that develops and validates new imaging methods for detecting brain abnormalities in neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson's disease, as well as epilepsy, depression, and other conditions associated with nerve loss in the brain. As people around the globe live longer, the impact of neurodegenerative diseases is expected to increase further with dire social and economical consequences for societies if no effective treatments are developed soon. The development at CIND is aimed to improve magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The ultimate goal of the scientific program is to identify imaging markers that improve accuracy in diagnosing neurodegenerative diseases at early stages, achieve more reliable prognoses of disease progression, and facilitate the discovery of effective treatment interventions. In addition to addressing the general needs for studying neurodegenerative diseases, another focus of CIND concerns brain diseases associated with military service and war combat, such as post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), brain trauma, gulf war illness and the long-term effects of these conditions on the mental health of veterans. The symbiosis between CIND and the Veterans Administration Medical Center in San Francisco makes this program uniquely suited to serve military veterans.
Other Name(s): UCSF Center for Imaging of Neurodegenerative Diseases
Abbreviation: CIND
Parent Organization: University of California at San Francisco; California; USA
Supporting Agency: NIBIB
Grant: P41
Resource Type(s): Biomedical technology research center, Training resource
Resource: Resource
URL: http://www.radiology.ucsf.edu/cind
*Id: nif-0000-10539
Related condition/disease: neurodegenerative disease, Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, Depressive Disorder, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, brain injury, gulf war illness
Address: VA Medical Center, San Francisco, 4150 Clement St. (114M), San Francisco, CA 94121
Keywords: depression, MRI, imaging, neuroimaging
Organism: Human
Link to OWL / RDF: Download this content as OWL/RDF

Curation status: Uncurated

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Notes

This page uses this default form:Resource

Old URL: http://www.cind.research.va.gov/index.asp

Contributors

Aarnaud, Ccdbuser, Nifbot2, Zaidaziz



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*Note: Neurolex imports many terms and their ids from existing community ontologies, e.g., the Gene Ontology. Neurolex, however, is a dynamic site and any content beyond the identifier should not be presumed to reflect the content or views of the source ontology. Users should consult with the authoritative source for each ontology for current information.

Facts about Resource:Center for Imaging of Neurodegenerative DiseasesRDF feed
AbbrevCIND  +
AddressVA Medical Center  +, San Francisco  +, 4150 Clement St. (114M)  +, and CA 94121  +
CurationStatuscurated  +
DefiningCitationhttp://www.radiology.ucsf.edu/cind  +
DefinitionBiomedical technology research center that Biomedical technology research center that develops and validates new imaging methods for detecting brain abnormalities in neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, frontotemporal dementia, Parkinson's disease, as well as epilepsy, depression, and other conditions associated with nerve loss in the brain. As people around the globe live longer, the impact of neurodegenerative diseases is expected to increase further with dire social and economical consequences for societies if no effective treatments are developed soon. The development at CIND is aimed to improve magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The ultimate goal of the scientific program is to identify imaging markers that improve accuracy in diagnosing neurodegenerative diseases at early stages, achieve more reliable prognoses of disease progression, and facilitate the discovery of effective treatment interventions. In addition to addressing the general needs for studying neurodegenerative diseases, another focus of CIND concerns brain diseases associated with military service and war combat, such as post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), brain trauma, gulf war illness and the long-term effects of these conditions on the mental health of veterans. The symbiosis between CIND and the Veterans Administration Medical Center in San Francisco makes this program uniquely suited to serve military veterans. niquely suited to serve military veterans.
ExampleImageCIND.PNG  +
GrantCategory:P41   +
Has default formThis property is a special property in this wiki.Resource  +
Has roleBiomedical technology research center  +, and Training resource  +
Idnif-0000-10539  +
Is part ofUniversity of California at San Francisco; California; USA  +
KeywordsDepression  +, MRI  +, Imaging  +, and Neuroimaging  +
LabelResource:Center for Imaging of Neurodegenerative Diseases  +
ModifiedDate7 June 2013  +
Page has default formThis property is a special property in this wiki.Resource  +
Related diseaseNeurodegenerative disease  +, Alzheimer's disease  +, Vascular dementia  +, Frontotemporal dementia  +, Parkinson's disease  +, Epilepsy  +, Depressive Disorder  +, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder  +, Brain injury  +, and Gulf war illness  +
SpeciesHuman  +
SuperCategoryResource  +
Supporting AgencyNIBIB  +
SynonymUCSF Center for Imaging of Neurodegenerative Diseases  +