arrow

From NeuroLex

Jump to: navigation, search



Resource:Stanford Center for Narcolepsy

Name: Resource:Stanford Center for Narcolepsy
Description: The Stanford Center for Narcolepsy was established in the 1980s as part of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Today, it is the world leader in narcolepsy research with more than 100 articles on narcolepsy to its name. The Stanford Center for Narcolepsy was the first to report that narcolepsy-cataplexy is caused by hypocretin (orexin) abnormalities in both animal models and humans.

Under the direction of Drs. Emmanuel Mignot and Seiji Nishino, the Stanford Center for Narcolepsy today treats several hundred patients with the disorder each year, many of whom participate in various research protocols. Other research protocols are conducted in animal models of narcolespy.

We are always looking for volunteers in our narcolepsy research studies. We are presently recruiting narcoleptic patients for genetic studies, drug clinical trials, hypocretin measurement studies in the CSF and functional MRI studies.

Monetary gifts to the Center for Narcolepsy are welcome. If you wish to make the ultimate gift, please consider participating in our Brain Donation Program.

To advance our understanding of the cause, course, and treatment of narcolepsy, in 2001 Stanford University started a program to obtain human brain tissue for use in narcolepsy research. Donated brains provide an invaluable resource and we have already used previously donated brains to demonstrate that narcolepsy is caused by a lack of a very specific type of cell in the brain, the hypocretin (orexin) neuron. While the brain donations do not directly help the donor, they provide an invaluable resource and a gift to others. The real answers as to what causes or occurrs in the brain when one has narcolepsy will only be definitively understood through the study of brain tissue. Through these precious donations, narcolepsy may eventually be prevented or reversible.

We currently are seeking brains from people with narcolepsy (with cataplexy and without), idiopathic hypersomnia and controls or people without a diagnosed sleep disorder of excessive sleepiness. Control brains are quite important to research, as findings must always be compared to tissue of a non-affected person. Friends and loved ones of people who suffer with narcoleps may wish to donate to our program to help fill this very important need.

Refer to the Movies tab for movies of Narcolepsy / Cataplexy.
Other Name(s): Stanford University Center for Narcolepsy
Parent Organization: Stanford University School of Medicine; California; USA, US Biobank
Supporting Agency: National Institutes of Health, Individual gifts
Related to: Human, Non-human animal
Resource Type(s): Topical portal, Brain bank, Material storage repository, Video
Keywords: Brain tissue, Brain, Tissue, Hypocretin, Orexin, Narcolepsy, Sleep disorder, Cataplexy, Idiopathic hypersomnia, Normal control, Kleine-Levin Syndrome, Dog, Zebrafish, Research, Therapy
Abbreviation: Stanford Center for Narcolepsy
Resource: Resource
URL: http://med.stanford.edu/school/Psychiatry/narcolepsy/
Id: nlx_144254
Link to OWL / RDF: Download this content as OWL/RDF

Curation status: Uncurated

This resource will be curated within 7 days.

For Resource Owners:
After the resource is curated, you may create a sitemap, which will help keep your registry description up-to-date and inform search engines about your resource.

Note: For a new resource, the website's URL must first be verified by a NIF curator before you may proceed.

Learn more about what NIF can do for your resource.
Proudly proclaim your inclusion in NIF by displaying the "Registered with NIF" button on your site. Please login to create the sitemap. (top right)

Notes

This page uses this default form:Resource

Contributors

Aarnaud, Ccdbuser



bookmark
Facts about Resource:Stanford Center for NarcolepsyRDF feed
AbbrevStanford Center for Narcolepsy  +
CommentAddress:Stanford University Center for Narcolepsy, 450 Broadway Street, M/C 5704, Redwood City, CA 94063
CurationStatuscurated  +
DefiningCitationhttp://med.stanford.edu/school/Psychiatry/narcolepsy/  +
DefinitionThe Stanford Center for Narcolepsy was est The Stanford Center for Narcolepsy was established in the 1980s as part of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. Today, it is the world leader in narcolepsy research with more than 100 articles on narcolepsy to its name. The Stanford Center for Narcolepsy was the first to report that narcolepsy-cataplexy is caused by hypocretin (orexin) abnormalities in both animal models and humans.

Under the direction of Drs. Emmanuel Mignot and Seiji Nishino, the Stanford Center for Narcolepsy today treats several hundred patients with the disorder each year, many of whom participate in various research protocols. Other research protocols are conducted in animal models of narcolespy.

We are always looking for volunteers in our narcolepsy research studies. We are presently recruiting narcoleptic patients for genetic studies, drug clinical trials, hypocretin measurement studies in the CSF and functional MRI studies.

Monetary gifts to the Center for Narcolepsy are welcome. If you wish to make the ultimate gift, please consider participating in our Brain Donation Program.

To advance our understanding of the cause, course, and treatment of narcolepsy, in 2001 Stanford University started a program to obtain human brain tissue for use in narcolepsy research. Donated brains provide an invaluable resource and we have already used previously donated brains to demonstrate that narcolepsy is caused by a lack of a very specific type of cell in the brain, the hypocretin (orexin) neuron. While the brain donations do not directly help the donor, they provide an invaluable resource and a gift to others. The real answers as to what causes or occurrs in the brain when one has narcolepsy will only be definitively understood through the study of brain tissue. Through these precious donations, narcolepsy may eventually be prevented or reversible.

We currently are seeking brains from people with narcolepsy (with cataplexy and without), idiopathic hypersomnia and controls or people without a diagnosed sleep disorder of excessive sleepiness. Control brains are quite important to research, as findings must always be compared to tissue of a non-affected person. Friends and loved ones of people who suffer with narcoleps may wish to donate to our program to help fill this very important need.

Refer to the Movies tab for movies of Narcolepsy / Cataplexy.
tab for movies of Narcolepsy / Cataplexy.
ExampleImageStanford Center for Narcolepsy.PNG  +
Has default formThis property is a special property in this wiki.Resource  +
Has roleTopical portal  +, Brain bank  +, Material storage repository  +, and Video  +
Idnlx_144254  +
Is part ofStanford University School of Medicine; California; USA  +, and US Biobank  +
KeywordsBrain tissue  +, Brain  +, Tissue  +, Hypocretin  +, Orexin  +, Narcolepsy  +, Sleep disorder  +, Cataplexy  +, Idiopathic hypersomnia  +, Normal control  +, Kleine-Levin Syndrome  +, Dog  +, Zebrafish  +, Research  +, and Therapy  +
LabelResource:Stanford Center for Narcolepsy  +
ModifiedDate16 March 2012  +
Page has default formThis property is a special property in this wiki.Resource  +
RelatedToHuman  +, and Non-human animal  +
SuperCategoryResource  +
Supporting AgencyNational Institutes of Health  +, and Individual gifts  +
SynonymStanford University Center for Narcolepsy  +